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U.S GAMES SYSTEMS TAROTS

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Haindl draws upon his knowledge of ancient cultures and his experiences with Native American life to create a unique deck that is a colorful and penetrating study of nature and spirituality. The Haindl Tarot deck relates the spiritual traditions of many cultures to human experiences and to the sacred wonder of our Earth. The captivating artwork of Haindl Tarot is non-traditional, yet the deck does follow the structure and meanings of the Rider-Waite deck for the most part, with some references to the Thoth Tarot. Each Major Arcana card shows kabbalistic, runic, and astrological associations. In the Minor Arcana each court card is represented by a god or goddess. The four suits are Wands -- Hindu; Cups -- Celtic and Norse; Swords -- Ancient Egyptian; and Stones -- Native American. The Haindl Tarot draws people in by the rare quality of its art. A painter who devoted his life to his work, Hermann Haindl brought to his pictures a skill and sophistication rare in modern Tarot decks. Drawn in by the unusual beauty of the cards, people who became familiar with the cards and learned how to use them discovered something more profound: a way of living dedicated to the sacred wonder of the Earth. The Haindl Tarot draws on the spiritual traditions of many cultures. By itself, this in not unique, as quite a few contemporary decks feature art from different cultures and mythologies. The Haindl Tarot, however, connects these traditions to real experience. These seventy-eight paintings reflect Haindl’s devotion to nature, his recognition of the feminine, his travels, his encounters with holy teachers and spirits, his respect for all peoples, his political belief in responsibility for the past and future, and the crises that have shaped his understanding. Drawn to the cards by their unique art, many thousands of people have found their lives changed, sometimes quite dramatically. -- From the Introduction to Haindl Tarot; A Reader’s Handbook by Rachel Pollack
Filled with circus and sideshow lore, LeGrande Circus & Sideshow Tarot is set in the glitter and mud world of the mid-century truck show. The Major Arcana is colorfully illustrated in the bravura style of vintage circus posters. Each tarot archetype is represented by a corresponding icon of the circus: the Emperor as the ringmaster, the Hermit as a tramp clown, the Sun as the blazing figure of a tiger leaping through a ring of fire. The Minor Arcana offers glimpses of the day-to-day life of the circus and sideshow with each suit representing a different aspect of life on the circus lot. The suit of Cups is the world of performance under the big top. The Swords are embedded deep in the bizarre and sometimes frightening heart of the sideshow. Each symbolically charged pasteboard will “step right up” and take the user deeper into this mysterious realm. The Coins represent the business of the show—the “front-end” with its managers keeping the troupe on the road and the “butcher” hawking his “floss” and popcorn in the stands. No one enters this realm of dreams without the work of the Wands, which conjure the backbreaking work of man and animal to raise the tent and create this palace of wonder. The stakes and tent-poles are the magic wands of this suit and no show can exist without the elemental magic of sweat and strain. Includes 78 cards and 60-page booklet, with upright and reversed meanings. Bonus: LeGrande Circus Card Spread by Jody Boginski and Lynn Araujo. Click here for printable spread. About Joe Lee Joe Lee has been clowning around since his early days in rural Indiana. In college he juggled art studies with a degree in medieval history. Joe furthered his education at the Ringling Brothers, Barnum and Bailey Clown College. He then worked as a professional circus clown with Ringling Brothers and other shows. After leaving the circus life, Joe moved to New York City where he studied and later taught art classes. Joe had occasional gigs as a fire eater. Joe returned to Indiana where he currently lives and works as an illustrator. He illustrated and wrote a number of books including The History of Clowns for Beginners. He is a regular contributor of editorial cartoons to the Bloomington Herald-Times. Joe has been teaching cartoon art and illustration for over nine years. Joe’s life-long interest in the circus prompted him to create the LeGrand Circus Tarot deck. His vibrant artwork begins with black and white ink drawings, which he then colors with colored pencils, markers, and watercolors. The 78 cards showcase Joe’s talent as a cartoonist and are reminiscent of mid-century circus posters.
Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Rider-Waite Deck, the Pamela Colman Smith Commemorative set will be cherished by all tarot collectors and art lovers. The deluxe set includes the Smith-Waite Centennial Tarot Deck and two books; The Artwork and Times of Pamela Colman Smith, by Stuart R. Kaplan, with over 100 examples of her non-tarot art, and The Pictorial Key to the Tarot by Arthur Edward Waite, in a new format. The Smith-Waite Centennial Edition Tarot Deck is reproduced from the original 1909 deck and comes with a 78-card deck with drawstring organza bag. The set also includes: 2 prints of Pamela Colman Smith, one photo and one self-portrait, both 5” x 7” suitable for framing; six color postcards of artwork by Pamela Colman Smith; and Spread Sheet Guide. Everything is attractively packaged in a deluxe keepsake case. About Pamela Colman Smith She was born February 16, 1878, in Middlesex, England to American parents. Her childhood years were spent between London, New York, and Kingston, Jamaica. During her teens, she traveled throughout England with the theatre company of Ellen Terry and Henry Irving. Thereafter, she began formal art training at the Pratt Institute of Brooklyn, graduating in 1897. Although American by birth, she returned to England, where she became a theatrical designer for miniature theatre, and an illustrator -- mainly of books, pamphlets and posters. Around 1903, she joined the Order of the Golden Dawn. In 1909, under the guidance of Arthur Edward Waite, she undertook a series of seventy-eight allegorical paintings described by Waite as a rectified tarot pack. The designs, published in the same year by William Rider and Son, exemplify the mysticism, ritual, imagination, fantasy, and deep emotions of the artist. Pamela Colman Smith would all but be forgotten except for the seventy-eight tarot paintings known as the Rider-Waite Tarot pack. She would no doubt be astonished and gladdened to know that today the deck touches the hearts and emotions of millions of people.

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